8 Surprising Traits of Highly Sensitive People video

08.09.2020

You have probably come across the term "highly sensitive person" somewhere on the internet or in the media. Today it is very common and popular to talk about it, with many articles focusing on highly sensitive people, especially children, and the unique skills and challenges they face. But what does the research say about highly sensitive people? Elaine Aron's book « The Highly Sensitive Person: How To Thrive When The World Overwasms You"(The Highly Sensitive Person: How To Thrive When The World Overwhelms You) suggests that up to 20% of the population may be" highly sensitive people. " But are all highly sensitive people the same? Here we discuss 8 possible types of highly sensitive people, and the research, or lack thereof, surrounding each type. These 8 types are: people with fine limits, orchid children, sensory-defensive people, empaths, people prone to fantasy, gifted, sensitive to electricity and sensitive.

1) People with Fine Limits
Hartmann was conducting research on people who experience regular nightmares. It turns out that these people had very vivid memories of their memories. These people are said to have "fine boundaries," which means that there is more than one connection between their mental functions and processes. Other characteristics observed by Hartmann and reported in his book ( Boundaries in the Mind , 1991) include being overwhelmed by sensory and emotional stimuli, pain and pleasure are more intense, an increased risk of allergies and diseases, suffering more in response to trauma and being more sensitive to stimuli. They are also often disorganized and spontaneous, and find it difficult to distinguish between dreams and reality.

1) People with Fine Limits
Hartmann was conducting research on people who experience regular nightmares. It turns out that these people had very vivid memories of their memories. These people are said to have "fine boundaries," which means that there is more than one connection between their mental functions and processes. Other characteristics observed by Hartmann and reported in his book ( Boundaries in the Mind , 1991) include being overwhelmed by sensory and emotional stimuli, pain and pleasure are more intense, an increased risk of allergies and diseases, suffering more in response to trauma and being more sensitive to stimuli. They are also often disorganized and spontaneous, and find it difficult to distinguish between dreams and reality.

2) Orchid Children
The idea of ​​the "orchid child" grew out of Bruce Ellis's work on environmental sensitivity in children. It was suggested that some children are simply 'biologically context sensitive', which means that they are more sensitive to changes in the environment, compared to children who can adapt and thrive in any environment. Psychologist Michael Pluess (2018) designed a scale specifically to measure this concept of environmental adaptability in children and found that 30% of children belonged to the category 'orchid child'.

3) Sensory-Defensive Person
Dr. Sharon Heller is the person who developed the term "Sensory-Defensive Person." These are people who are more sensitive than the average person to sensory information. Some of their characteristics are: easily surprised, ticklish, dislikes crowds, dislikes certain food textures, and is disorganized by excessive visual stimulation. At more extreme levels, Sensory-Defensive People tend to have some type of diagnosis, often of learning disabilities or schizophrenia, but many Sensory-Defensive People do not have disorders.

4) Empaths
Being empathetic refers to someone who is very sensitive to the moods, emotions, and mental states of others. Dr. Michael Smith investigated this phenomenon and found that 5% of the general population would be classified as empathic. However, 25% of highly sensitive people would be too. Abigail Marsh (2018) even showed that there are brain differences between those who are empathic and those who are not. Empaths are more sensitive to fearful faces, as their amygdala had intensified activity in response to them.

5) People Prone to Fantasy
The concept of a "person prone to fantasy" was something that Wilson & Barber discovered in 1981. They found that about 4% of the population would have this trait. They tend to fantasize a lot and are very prone to paranormal experiences. Many are deeply religious, have visions and hear voices. Traits include: imaginary friends, claims to be psychic, healing people, and experiencing sensations imagined as real. Merckelbach, Campo, Hardy, and Giesbrecht (2005) also found that it was associated with dissociation.

6) Gifted
Dabrowski's research specifically looked at gifted children and found five areas in which they were "overexcitable" or "super-sensitive." 1) Psychomotricity - including: "Nervous habits, impulsivity and insomnia". 2) Sensual - including: "allergies, acute senses and need for comfort." 3) Intellectual - including: "deep curiosity, theoretical thinking and asking questions." 4) Imaginational - including: "vivid dreams, waking fantasies, and love affairs." 5) Emotional - including: "anxiety, shyness and loneliness." These ideas are part of a theory known as positive decay. The idea that these overexcitabilities are linked to giftedness is also supported by other research (Piechowski & Miller, 1995).

7) Sensitive to electricity
In 1980 Shallis conducted an investigation in which he surveyed people who are more sensitive to electricity. These people were mostly women. What Shallis found was surprising. 70% of these people had allergies, 60% were ill before thunderstorms, and 23% had been struck by lightning before. However, more recently this condition / sensitivity has been rejected, and that symptoms occur more when people think they are being exposed to electricity, rather than when they actually are.

8) The "Sensitive"
Finally, we come to the most controversial type - "the Sensitive." These are similar to other types of Highly Sensitive people, but with psychic / extrasensory perception. For example, they may feel feelings, "know the future," and see shadows that do not exist. As with anything supernatural research doesn't support your claims, but you never know!

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